Grievance

 

The Collective Bargaining Agreement we negotiate is a legally binding contract. When FAU violates the terms of this agreement, we can use what’s known as the Grievance process to set things right. The details of the Grievance process are laid out in Article 20 of the CBA.

There are some important things to know:

  • All faculty covered by the CBA can file a grievance.
  • You have 30 calendar days from a triggering event to file a grievance, so let us know ASAP if you think you might have one, as it takes many days to prepare for filing (CBA 20.8(a)(1)).
  • Only dues-paying members of UFF-FAU receive free assistance with this process, including legal representation. To qualify for UFF’s help, you must be a member before your rights are violated. Think of it like insurance: you can’t buy it after your car gets totaled or your house burns down.
  • Non-members are not automatically able to proceed all the way to arbitration. UFF retains the exclusive right to invoke arbitration. This is to safeguard the process from frivolous or hopeless cases.
  • The cost of arbitration for non-members is typically $2k-$4k, plus the cost of an attorney (which can exceed $20k).
  • Not all grievances are individual: sometimes FAU violates the CBA so egregiously that UFF files a grievance on behalf of the entire chapter. We take contract enforcement very seriously. The system is set up to protect us, and we vigorously defend faculty rights.

Remember your Weingarten Rights: the right to have a union representative at any meeting that might result in discipline. So if it rises to that level, even during the meeting, you have the right to immediately ask for union representation. If that’s not practical, you should ask for a postponement until your union rep can be present. Let us know if that situation arises and we can be there. Click here to learn more.

Recent Posts

Tuition or Dinner? Nearly Half of College Students Surveyed in a New Report Are Going Hungry

[UFF-FAU Preface: The Florida SUS metrics ignore the realities of student poverty by failing to address basic requirements for student success like having access to adequate food and housing. Many legislators wrongly assume most students share their privileged backgrounds and hold the rest in contempt as nothing more than a “burden” upon public higher education. UFF-FAU opposes the  state metrics as contrary to the mission of public higher education: providing quality access for all students from all backgrounds.]

 

Kayla Laterman, The New York Times May 2, 2019

In the coming weeks, thousands of college students will walk across a stage and proudly accept their diplomas. Many of them will be hungry.

A senior at Lehman College in the Bronx dreams of starting her day with breakfast. An undergraduate at New York University said he has been so delirious from hunger, he’s caught himself walking down the street not realizing where he’s going. A health sciences student at Stony Brook University on Long Island describes “poverty naps,” where she decides to go to sleep rather than deal with her hunger pangs.

These are all examples of food insecurity, the state of having limited or uncertain access to food. Stories about college hunger have been largely anecdotal, cemented by ramen and macaroni and cheese jokes. But recent data indicate the problem is more serious and widespread, affecting almost half of the student population at community and public colleges.

A survey released this week by Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice indicated that 45 percent of student respondents from over 100 institutions said they had been food insecure in the past 30 days. In New York, the nonprofit found that among City University of New York (CUNY) students, 48 percent had been food insecure in the past 30 days.

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